World Edventures and Service Tours

Call Us at (855) 355-TRAVEL (855.355.8728)

Additional Information About Travel to Peru

Tipping

At the conclusion of your tour, it is customary to offer your tour guide and driver a gratuity. Your WEST tour coordinator will collect the gratuity at any point during the tour (many travelers like to pay ahead of time to get it out of the way). Although it is not required, your driver and tour guides rely on these tips, and work hard to ensure you an unforgettable experience. We recommend tipping the equivalence of $3 USD/CAD per person per day for your driver and $7 USD/CAD to $10 USD/CAD per person per day for your tour guide. If applicable, we also recommend the equivalency of $3 USD/CAD per local guide, payable following the local tour. Tips can only be paid in cash. Please keep current local currency exchange rates in mind when tipping.
Passport & Visa Requirements

In order to enter Peru, U.S. and Canadian citizens need a valid passport. The expiration date must extend at least six months beyond the date of your return home.We recommend having at least two blank passport pages for entry stamps.  Upon arrival in Peru, you will receive an Andean Immigration card that you will need to present when visiting Machu Picchu. No visa is required for U.S. or Canadian citizens. If you are not a U.S. or Canadian citizen, you must contact each country’s consulate for your specific entry requirements.

Baggage Allowance

Airlines have varying weight restrictions on luggage. Some airlines may impose additional charges if you choose to check any baggage. Please contact your airline or refer to its website for detailed information regarding your airline’s checked baggage policies. Bear in mind that your luggage will probably weigh more on your return trip due to souvenir shopping. We allow only one suitcase per person. One carry-on bag is also permitted, provided that it does not exceed 45 inches (length + width + height). There may be times when you’ll have to handle your own bags, and you’ll find that lightweight luggage provides a distinct advantage. Make sure you label your baggage and carry valuables, medication and documents in your carry-on luggage.

Transportation

Flights arrive in and depart from Lima. On-tour transportation is provided primarily by private motor coach, but may include planes, trains, boats, ferries, or other modes. While most destinations on your tour are accessible on foot, some cities may require some use of public transportation. Buses serve most cities and surroundings. Taxis are also available. Make sure the meter is running and always ask for a cab number and receipt.

Clothing & Packing Tips

Your itinerary focuses on the outdoors, so your clothing should be casual and appropriate for outdoor use. We advise that you pack in layers. Light, loose-fitting clothing that provides comfort when exploring the sights is essential for your tour. A sturdy pair of walking shoes or sneakers is also recommended. Long pants, long-sleeved shirts and a strong insect repellent containing DEET is highly recommended for visits to the rainforests of the Amazon. You may want to pack dressier attire if you plan to visit a high-end restaurant or attend a special performance. It’s always a good idea to be prepared for any eventuality—a lightweight sports jacket and/or rainwear are advised. A sun hat, sunglasses and sunscreen are recommended for all outdoor activities, even on overcast days. A small bottle of hand sanitizer may be helpful when other facilities are not readily available while on the road. Binoculars are very useful for bird- and animal-watching, along with a field guide if you’re interested in the different species you’ll spot. 

Electricity

Peru operates on 220 volts and uses Types A or C plugs with two flat pins or two round pins, respectivelyWe recommend packing a universal adapter, as well as a voltage converter if you plan on using your own hairdryer or other device without a built-in converter. The strength of the air conditioning is often not as strong or as cool as what you might be used to in the U.S. or Canada. When air conditioning is available, it is usually regulated seasonally and controlled centrally by the hotel. Your hotels may provide hairdryers, irons, and other small appliances. However, these amenities cannot be guaranteed.

Health

Travelers should be reasonably fit. You will be traveling at altitudes as high as 12,000 feet above sea level, and these high altitudes can sometimes cause difficulties for travelers who have heart problems or respiratory ailments. Even healthy travelers may sometimes experience altitude sickness, a temporary condition featuring symptoms of headache, fatigue, nausea and light-headedness. Until your body acclimates to the higher altitudes, we suggest that you stay hydrated and limit your intake of caffeine and alcohol. If you suffer from any of these conditions, please speak to your healthcare provider regarding any potential health risks. 


There are no major health risks associated with traveling to Peru. At least 60 days prior to departure, check with your doctor or healthcare provider for the latest updates and entry requirements, or visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website at cdc.gov. 


In order for you to stay healthy throughout your tour, we recommend the following:

  • Drink only bottled water, and refrain from ingesting tap water, including when brushing your teeth;
  • Avoid eating fresh fruits and vegetables unless they’re cooked or washed in clean water and peeled;
  • Bring a small first aid kit, including antacids, anti-diarrhea medication, motion sickness medication and any prescription medications;
  • If you have medication that you take daily, be sure you have enough for each day of the tour and any possible delays encountered;
  • If you have dietary restrictions and/or food allergies please notify us at least 30 days prior to your departure.
Cuisine

Peruvian cuisine reflects both the country’s indigenous cultures as well as European colonial and Pacific Rim influences. Staples include grains, like quinoa, maize, and rice, as well beans, potatoes, and meat. Ceviche, traditionally raw sea bass marinated with lime and chilies, is a national dish. Adventurous eaters may want to try cuy, or roasted guinea pig that’s cooked over an open fire. You can also raise a toast with Peru’s famous pisco, the delicious (and sour) white-grape brandy.

Currency

You will use the Peruvian sol in PeruBetter rates of exchange are usually available overseas, although it’s worth ordering some currency from your local bank to use when you first arrive. We strongly advise that you take debit/bank cards and credit cards, which can be used to withdraw cash at local banks as needed. You can use most debit/credit cards at ATMs on the international networks Cirrus and Plus, but make sure to check with your home bank about withdrawal fees. Inform your bank and credit card company of your travel plans so that they won’t confuse your international purchases for fraudulent charges. International banks and businesses primarily accept debit and credit cards that work with the EMV chip system. If you do not already have at least one debit or credit card with a chip in it, we strongly recommend requesting one from your bank prior to your tour.

Connectivity

Wi-Fi is available in most hotels, though some charges may apply. There is no Wi-Fi on any of the motor coaches. Please contact your mobile service provider for information on roaming charges.

Time Zones

Peru is five hours behind Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), except Iquitos, which is six hours behind GMT. When it is noon in California, it is 3 p.m. in Lima, and 2 p.m. in Iquitos.